Don’t do this after brushing

Posted by watchmen
July 9, 2021
Posted in OPINION

Brush your teeth ideally after every meal or at least twice a day, in the morning and the evening.

Because less saliva is produced while sleeping at night, the more residual fluoride that is left, on teeth, the more protection from acid-producing bacteria.

Rinsing immediately after brushing.

That’s a common mistake everyone makes, according to the Oral Health Foundation, a charity organization in the United Kingdom.

It recommends that toothpaste remains on the teeth a few minutes before rinsing to maximize the health benefits of fluoride, which strengthens tooth enamel.

Some would even say to delay rinsing for up to 30 minutes to prolong tooth decay prevention.

Rinsing after spitting the toothpaste will wash away the concentrated fluoride and reduce its effectiveness.

According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, fluoride in toothpaste has contributed to the decrease in the number of missing or decaying teeth in American children.

Then there’s the two-minute rule. To maximize the benefit of fluoride toothpaste, brush for at least two minutes to cover the teeth enamel on all surfaces.

Hold the toothbrush with the bristles at a 45-degree angle to the surface of the tooth. This allows the bristles to reach under the gum line and get rid of the bacteria.

Brush gently and with a soft bristle.

More fluoride exposure helps strengthen tooth enamel and improves protection against decay.

Brush your teeth ideally after every meal or at least twice a day, in the morning and the evening.

Because less saliva is produced while sleeping at night, the more residual fluoride that is left, on teeth, the more protection from acid-producing bacteria.

At night, fluoride mouthwash helps restore some of the enamel lost while eating foods and drinking beverages.

Floss first, then brush. A 2018 study of 25 dental students, published in the Journal of Periodontology, showed that flossing first, then brushing, is the better standard procedure.

The floss-then-brush method, according to the study, reduces plaque more than the brush-then-floss method./WDJ

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *